Saying "Goodbye" Well (Post 3)

Saying "Goodbye" Well (Post 3)

In addition to a healthy theology of grief (last week), a healthy theology of death is also essential to being able to say “goodbye” well when the time comes. Having a “theology of death” may seem odd, morbid, and even wrong. Ours is such a life-affirming and life-focused culture that we rarely think of death. Therefore, it is not surprising that most of us don’t have a theology of death, much less a well-developed one. But this is exactly what we need in order to be able to say goodbye well.

Saying “Goodbye” Well (Post 2)

Saying “Goodbye” Well (Post 2)

As I shared last week, in January I said “goodbye” to my father, as he passed “from the land of the dying to the land of the living.” Since then I’ve reflected on four principles that can help us say “goodbye” well. I hope you find these principles helpful as you join me in transitioning from the season of saying “hello” to the season of saying “goodbye.”

Blog Hiatus

I’m going to take a little time away from posting weekly articles on this site, for personal and professional reasons. My father recently passed away, and I need to create some “space” to process his passing. Furthermore, much of the next month is consumed with establishing the Society of Christian Scholars on March 1 (www.SocietyofChristianScholars.org). I hope to post again in early March.

Until then, grace and peace.

Top 3 Posts of 2018: #2 - Four Reasons Why the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (1 of 8)

Top 3 Posts of 2018: #2 - Four Reasons Why the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (1 of 8)

More people commented on this post than any other. So I was surprised that this was the second most popular article of last year…I expected it to come in at #1. With 462 views, the second most popular article of 2018 was Four Reasons Why the World’s Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (1 of 8). 

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 18)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 18)

Over the past few months I’ve outlined a robust argument showing the Bible is inerrant, due to it being written by those commissioned by God to communicate His Word (prophets for the Old Testament and apostles for the New Testament). However, some alleged writings of apostles didn’t “make the cut” and are not included in the New Testament (such as the Gospel of Thomas). Some cry “foul” and accuse the early church of picking and choosing what they wanted to include in the Bible. Is this true? How did the early church come to conclude which books should be included in the New Testament?

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 17)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 17)

We now have good reason to believe all the New Testament books written by Jesus’ twelve disciples and Paul are God’s inspired, inerrant Word. However, two other books were penned by authors who do not have these credentials: James and Jude. Why should we accept their writings as authoritative?

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 16)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 16)

What about Paul? We have good reason to believe Jesus commissioned his twelve disciples to write the New Testament, in the same way God commissioned Old Testament prophets to communicate God’s Word in their time, without error. But Paul was not one of Jesus’ disciples. Yet he wrote over half the New Testament. Are his writings to be included in the inerrant Word of God?

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Arguments (Post 14)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Arguments (Post 14)

Currently many views of the Bible clamor for our attention. But we now have good reason to believe Jesus is God and therefore is the authoritative source to consult on this issue. What did Jesus think of the Bible? Does he take a stand? If so, what is his position? And why should anyone think he or she is a greater authority than Jesus on this (or any other) question? In this article, I will begin exploring Jesus’ view of the Bible.

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 13)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 13)

In order to trust Jesus’ view of the Old and New Testaments, we must first establish him as an authority on the subject. If it is true that he is who he claimed to be—God in flesh—he is the ultimate authority! There is a second line of evidence proving Jesus is the almighty, eternal God. From these proofs of Jesus’ divinity the third premise in the argument for inerrancy is validated. I’ll discuss both these points in this article.

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 12)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 12)

Some object the evidence that Jesus is the Messiah, and thus God, is inadequate. Three specific concerns are often raised. If one or more of these objections can be sustained, this piece of evidence for the deity of Christ crumbles. So what are these objections, and do they have any validity?

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 11)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 11)

We depend on probability for most of our knowledge. Will this plane make it to its destination? Most probably (or we don’t get on it). Will I have enough for retirement? Most probably (or we make some changes). Will this be the right job for me? Most probably (or we don’t take the job). Making decisions based on probabilities is so common we usually don’t even think twice about this approach to discovering truth.