If God Exists, Why Is There Pain and Suffering? (Post 9)

If God Exists, Why Is There Pain and Suffering? (Post 9)

We have seen that God has a very good reason to allow pain and suffering in the world—its possibility was the only way he could create us with true freedom and all that goes with it. But what about hurricanes, earthquakes, and diseases? Can God not limit these and still preserve human freedom? He can, but it seem there may be other morally sufficient reasons for him to permit these evils. I’ll offer an argument to this conclusion in the next few posts.

If God Exists, Why Is There Pain and Suffering? (Post 5)

If God Exists, Why Is There Pain and Suffering? (Post 5)

Many argue the reality of pain and suffering proves God does not exist. But this is only true if the premises leading to this conclusion are correct. Last week I discussed why Muslims reject the first premise and why they are wrong. But others think the problem is elsewhere: either God is not all-powerful, or Evil is not real. Do either of these responses solve the problem?

Saying "Goodbye" Well (Post 3)

Saying "Goodbye" Well (Post 3)

In addition to a healthy theology of grief (last week), a healthy theology of death is also essential to being able to say “goodbye” well when the time comes. Having a “theology of death” may seem odd, morbid, and even wrong. Ours is such a life-affirming and life-focused culture that we rarely think of death. Therefore, it is not surprising that most of us don’t have a theology of death, much less a well-developed one. But this is exactly what we need in order to be able to say goodbye well.

Saying “Goodbye” Well (Post 2)

Saying “Goodbye” Well (Post 2)

As I shared last week, in January I said “goodbye” to my father, as he passed “from the land of the dying to the land of the living.” Since then I’ve reflected on four principles that can help us say “goodbye” well. I hope you find these principles helpful as you join me in transitioning from the season of saying “hello” to the season of saying “goodbye.”

Blog Hiatus

I’m going to take a little time away from posting weekly articles on this site, for personal and professional reasons. My father recently passed away, and I need to create some “space” to process his passing. Furthermore, much of the next month is consumed with establishing the Society of Christian Scholars on March 1 (www.SocietyofChristianScholars.org). I hope to post again in early March.

Until then, grace and peace.

Top 3 Posts of 2018: #2 - Four Reasons Why the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (1 of 8)

Top 3 Posts of 2018: #2 - Four Reasons Why the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (1 of 8)

More people commented on this post than any other. So I was surprised that this was the second most popular article of last year…I expected it to come in at #1. With 462 views, the second most popular article of 2018 was Four Reasons Why the World’s Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (1 of 8). 

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 18)

What Is The Bible? Good and Bad Answers and Arguments (Post 18)

Over the past few months I’ve outlined a robust argument showing the Bible is inerrant, due to it being written by those commissioned by God to communicate His Word (prophets for the Old Testament and apostles for the New Testament). However, some alleged writings of apostles didn’t “make the cut” and are not included in the New Testament (such as the Gospel of Thomas). Some cry “foul” and accuse the early church of picking and choosing what they wanted to include in the Bible. Is this true? How did the early church come to conclude which books should be included in the New Testament?