Moral Absolutes

How to Solve Moral Dilemmas (Post 2 of 2)

How to Solve Moral Dilemmas (Post 2 of 2)

Sometimes we face real moral dilemmas—doing one thing we ought to do means doing something else we ought not do. What are we to do when we are in these hard spots? Last week I discussed one solution that won’t work. This week I’ll look at a second option that is better than the first, but still not a good solution. Then I’ll offer what I believe to be the best ways to solve these moral dilemmas.

If God Exists, Why Is There Pain and Suffering? (Post 5)

If God Exists, Why Is There Pain and Suffering? (Post 5)

Many argue the reality of pain and suffering proves God does not exist. But this is only true if the premises leading to this conclusion are correct. Last week I discussed why Muslims reject the first premise and why they are wrong. But others think the problem is elsewhere: either God is not all-powerful, or Evil is not real. Do either of these responses solve the problem?

Christianity vs. Buddhism: Five Reasons To Believe God is a Person (3 of 5)

Christianity vs. Buddhism: Five Reasons To Believe God is a Person (3 of 5)

 “Why do you believe God is a person?” asked the CEO sitting next to me on the plane. He was a convert to Tibetan Buddhism and thought it more reasonable to think of God as an impersonal force. Over the next two hours, I shared five reasons I believe God is a person—the same five I have been summarizing in this series. We now come to the third reason, which is that only a Person can be the cause of the moral values we all share (such as “Racism is wrong”).

Top 3 Posts of 2017: #2 - Two Exceptional Women and One Extremely Fortunate Son: Three Lessons Learned (1 of 3)

Top 3 Posts of 2017: #2 - Two Exceptional Women and One Extremely Fortunate Son: Three Lessons Learned (1 of 3)

(As we look back on 2017 I'm posting the three blog posts which received the most views. If you missed these the first time around, hopefully you will enjoy these reposts!)  In the spring of 1962 “Jean” was eighteen years old, pregnant, unmarried, and scared. Her boyfriend wasn’t interested in marriage or raising a child. Her whole world was changing before her eyes, but she never considered abortion.  On December 5, 1962 she gave birth to a healthy baby boy. On September 7, 2017—almost 55 years later— I discovered I am that child. From this discovery I have reflected on three essential truths in new and deeper ways.

Two Exceptional Women and One Extremely Fortunate Son: Three Lessons Learned (1 of 3)

Two Exceptional Women and One Extremely Fortunate Son: Three Lessons Learned (1 of 3)

In the spring of 1962 “Jean” was eighteen years old, pregnant, unmarried, and scared. Her boyfriend wasn’t interested in marriage or raising a child. Her whole world was changing before her eyes, but she never considered abortion.  On December 5, 1962 she gave birth to a healthy baby boy. On September 7, 2017—almost 55 years later— I discovered I am that child. From this discovery I have reflected on three essential truths in new and deeper ways.